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FAQ TBAS ver 2.0
 
 

Table of Contents

  1. Why did the PCSM scoring algorithm change?
  2. When will the new PCSM 2.0 scores be used?
  3. I already had a PCSM score based on the old scoring method. Is my old score still valid?
  4. How much did new scores typically change?
  5. I already had a PCSM score based on the old algorithm. Do I need to re-test?
  6. If my PCSM 2.0 score is lower than my old PCSM score, can I re-test?
  7. Does the scoring change mean the old PCSM (or AFOQT-Pilot) scores were flawed or unsound?
  8. How does the new AFOQT-Pilot scoring differ from the old AFOQT-Pilot scoring?
  9. How does the new PCSM 2.0 scoring differ from the old scoring?

1. Why did the PCSM scoring algorithm change ?

The pilot training pipeline and applicant pool have changed since the TBAS version of the PCSM program became operational in 2006. The new algorithm takes into account these changes to improve prediction of success in Initial Flight Screening and Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training. It is now also calibrated to predict training performance for both manned and RPA pilot candidates

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2. When will the new PCSM 2.0 scores be used ?

The first selection board to use the new PCSM 2.0 scores will be the August 2013 OTS board which has an application submission and update suspense of 6 June 2013.

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3. I already had a PCSM score based on the old scoring method. Is my old score valid ?

The old scores will no longer be used in selection boards beginning summer 2013.

Old PCSM and/or AFOQT-Pilot scores expired on February 13, 2013. Your scores of record were automatically converted to a PCSM 2.0 score on February 14, 2013 (see #5 for a limited exception).

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4. How much did new scores typically change ?

Scores for a few applicants increased, while those for most decreased. On average, PCSM 2.0 scores were approximately 20 to 30 percentile points lower than old PCSM scores (on a scale of 1-99, with 99 being the best). Because the applicant pool has become more competitive over time, PCSM 2.0 scores have been adjusted (downward) to more accurately indicate an individual’s percentile ranking relative to current pilot applicants. Because the AFOQT-Pilot scores indicate an individual’s percentile ranking relative to current officer applicants, score changes were much smaller, with a typical score decrease of approximately 4 percentile points (on a scale of 1-99). These changes ensure that applicant scores are evenly distributed from 1 to 99 to more accurately reflect relative levels of pilot aptitude.

Because of changes to the algorithms, some PCSM and AFOQT-Pilot scores will change more dramatically.

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5. I already had a PCSM score based on the old algorithm. Do I need to re-test ?

For nearly all applicants, your current score was automatically converted to a PCSM 2.0 score on February 14, 2013.

Only a small number of applicants will need to re-take the AFOQT or TBAS. If a retest is required contact your local TCO to schedule to retake the test.

You will need to retake the AFOQT if you completed it prior to 2006 (before implementation of AFOQT Form S). If you are unsure if your score of record is Form S, go to https://w20.afpc.randolph.af.mil/afoqtsnet20/default.aspx to verify.

You will need to retake the TBAS if you last completed it prior to August 2007 (before implementation of TBAS version 1.2.33). Contact the PCSM office to verify whether your TBAS score of record in version 1.2.33 or later.

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6. If my PCSM 2.0 score is lower than my old PCSM score, can I re-test ?

Yes. All applicants may re-test on TBAS (regardless of whether your score increased or decreased). As before, TBAS administrations require a minimum of 180 days between testing sessions. As with the AFOQT, your most recent TBAS score will be your score of record.

Candidates who have already tested twice on the TBAS prior to February 14, 2013 will be authorized on a one-time basis an additional TBAS administration.

AFOQT retest policy remains unchanged: two lifetime attempts on the AFOQT are permitted, with a minimum of 180 days between attempts. If you need to take the AFOQT for a third time because you last tested prior to 2006 (before implementation of AFOQT Form S), you will need to request a waiver. To request a waiver, call AFPC Testing at DSN 665-4221 or e-mail AFPC Testing (AFPC.Testing@us.af.mil).

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7. Does the scoring change mean that old PCSM (or AFOQT-Pilot) scores were flawed or unsound ?

No. The current algorithms were and have remained valid predictors of pilot training success. Both the old and new scores on the AFOQT and PCSM are significantly correlated with measures of success in initial pilot (and RPA) training. The new algorithms simply provide an improvement in prediction over otherwise valid selection tools.

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8. How does the new AFOQT-Pilot scoring differ from the old AFOQT-Pilot scoring?

The AFOQT-Pilot composite continues to measure quantitative ability, instrument comprehension, and aviation knowledge, and is based on the same AFOQT subtests as before. The new algorithm optimizes the weights of the subtests to provide the best measure for predicting training success.

See http://access.afpc.af.mil/pcsmdmz/AFOQTPrepMaterials.html for additional information on the AFOQT-Pilot composite.

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9. How does the new PCSM 2.0 scoring differ from the old scoring ?

As before, the new PCSM 2.0 algorithm is based on the AFOQT-Pilot, TBAS, and flying hours. The only change is optimizing the weighting of the predictors and properly distributing the scores from 1 to 99 to best predict success based on the qualifications of the current applicants. When you check your new PCSM 2.0 score, you will be able to see as with the current scores how much your PCSM 2.0 score would increase with additional flying hours.

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