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FAQ PCSM 2015
 
 

Table of Contents

  1. Why did my AFOQT and PCSM scores change?
  2. How do I know which version of the AFOQT I took?
  3. Are my old (Form S) AFOQT and PCSM scores valid?
  4. I already had a PCSM score based on the old AFOQT Form S score. Do I need to re-test?
  5. How were Form S scores converted?
  6. How much did converted scores change?
  7. If my new AFOQT or PCSM score is lower than my old score, can I re-test?
  8. How is the new test version (Form T) different from the old version (Form S)?
  9. How does the new AFOQT Form T Pilot scoring differ from the old AFOQT Form S Pilot scoring?

1. Why did my AFOQT and PCSM scores change?

A new version of the AFOQT (Form T) became operational on February 14, 2015. This new version includes updated test content and is normed against a representative sample of the current applicant pool.

If you took the old version of the AFOQT (Form S), your scores were converted to allow for comparability with scores on the new AFOQT (Form T) version.

The converted AFOQT scores are also used in the PCSM algorithm to allow pilot applicants who tested on the AFOQT Form S to be compared against the same metric as applicants testing on the new AFOQT Form T version.

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2. How do I know which version of the AFOQT I took?

When you check your scores on the AFOQT website (https://w20.afpc.randolph.af.mil/afoqtsnet20/DODBanner.aspx), “Form/Version” will be listed as “T/1” or “T/2” if you took the new Form T version.

If you took the older Form S version, your scores were automatically converted to the new Form T metric on April 17, 2015. Form S scores that have been converted to the Form T metric are denoted as Form/Version “T/6” or “T/7” on the AFOQT website.

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3. Are my old (Form S) AFOQT and PCSM scores still valid?

No. As of April 17, 2015, selection boards will only accept Form T scores or scores that have been converted to the Form T metric. Form S scores that have been converted to the Form T metric are denoted as Form/Version “T/6” or “T/7” on the AFOQT website (https://w20.afpc.randolph.af.mil/afoqtsnet20/DODBanner.aspx).

Only PCSM scores based on the Form T version of the AFOQT (or converted metric) will be accepted.

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4. I already had a PCSM score based on the old AFOQT Form S score. Do I need to re-test?

No. All AFOQT and PCSM scores based on Form S were automatically converted on April 17, 2015.

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5. How were Form S scores converted?

The conversion algorithms were developed based on a large sample of test-takers who were administered both the Form S and Form T versions. Converted scores indicate what someone with your combination of Form S subtest (e.g., Instrument Comprehension, Table Reading) scores, on average, would have been expected to receive if you had actually taken Form T and had the same level of test performance.

Because of significant changes to test content (see #8), there is not perfect equivalency between Form S and Form T scores. Applicants who tested on Form S are encouraged, but not required, to take Form T if possible (see #7).

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6. How much did converted scores change?

Form T was normed against a representative sample of the current applicant pool to more accurately indicate an individual’s percentile ranking relative to current applicants. Because the applicant pool has become more competitive over time (i.e., since implementation of Form S in 2005), most individuals who tested on Form S will receive lower scores when their scores are converted to the Form T metric.

On average, converted AFOQT-Pilot scores are approximately X percentile points lower than Form S scores prior to the conversion (on a scale of 1-99, with 99 being the best); on average, converted PCSM scores are approximately X percentile points lower than PCSM scores prior to the conversion.

Because the content of some Form T subtests changed more significantly than other subtests (see #8), the conversion algorithms are based on individual Form S subtest (e.g., Instrument Comprehension, Table Reading), rather than composite (e.g., Pilot), scores. As a result, converted scores for some applicants stayed the same or even increased, while converted scores for other applicants decreased by a greater amount.

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7. If my new AFOQT or PCSM score is lower than my old score, can I re-test?

All applicants may re-test on the AFOQT (regardless of whether your score increased or decreased).

AFOQT administrations require a minimum of 150 days between testing sessions (per AFI 36-2605 Interim Change dated 26 January 2015). If you choose to re-test, your most recent AFOQT score will be your score of record, and your PCSM score will be updated accordingly.

Candidates who have already tested twice on the AFOQT Form S, but have not yet tested on Form T, are authorized an additional AFOQT administration. Contact the HQ AFPC Test Management Office to request a waiver at 210-565-4221 (DSN 665-4221) or email AFPC.Testing@us.af.mil.

TBAS re-testing policy remains unchanged (limited to two lifetime attempts, with a minimum of 150 days between testing sessions).

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8. How is the new test version (Form T) different from the old version (Form S)?

As before, scores on a variety of Form T AFOQT subtests are combined to produce composite scores in six areas: Verbal, Quantitative, Academic, Pilot, CSO, and ABM. However, there have been a number of changes to test questions to improve test precision, currency, and breadth of content.

Key changes to Form T include a new Reading Comprehension subtest involving passages modeled on officer Professional Military Education materials, and a scenario-based Situational Judgment Test based on challenging leadership and interpersonal scenarios that junior officers may face.

Full information on Form T, including sample test questions, is available at: http://access.afpc.af.mil/pcsmdmz/Form%20T.HTML

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9. How does the new AFOQT Form T Pilot composite differ from the old AFOQT Form S Pilot composite?

As before, the AFOQT Pilot composite is based on quantitative ability (Math Knowledge), perceptual speed (Table Reading), and aviation-specific knowledge and spatial skills (Aviation Information and Instrument Comprehension).

Of the subtests contributing to the AFOQT Form T Pilot composite score, Instrument Comprehension has undergone the most significant changes. Instrument Comprehension has been updated with new aircraft designs, clearer graphics, and modernized instrument displays, and timing has been shortened to require more speeded response.

See http://access.afpc.af.mil/pcsmdmz/AFOQTPrepMaterials.html for additional information on the AFOQT-Pilot and other AFOQT composites.

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